European Court of Human Rights says Russians right to arrest Magnitsky for tax evasion, but claims w/no evidence violent death

William Browder.
Envelope from Logos to Rilend, exhibit filed in U.S. federal court in the Prevezon case.
Pay receipt for the letter sent to Rilend dated July 24, 2007 (fourth line in column on right), exhibit filed in U.S. federal court in the Prevezon case.
Envelope from Logos to Makhaon, exhibit filed in U.S. federal court in the Prevezon case.
Magnitsky’s mother in film “The Magnitsky Act: Behind the Scenes,” by Andrei Nekrasov.
Death certificate. Closed (meaning past) craniocerebral injury (question mark) and No signs of a violent death detected.
  • So, not beaten to death. But those reports do not appear to sway the Court from its determined conclusions.
The letter transmitting to report of Magnitsky’s death to William Browder.
  • Here’s a point that the Court did not take up, perhaps because it didn’t know. And I don’t know if PHR knew that the documents it got from William Browder, who commissioned its report, used a translation that was erroneous in a key place.
Dr. Robert Bux.
Judge William H. Pauley III.
  • So, the Court did not accept the Russians’ version, which it said lacked proof, or even the Public Oversight Commission’s report, and instead accepted Magnitsky’s mother’s new version, also without proof, that Magnitsky was “subjected to ill-treatment by the guards in the remand prison.”
  • Also to issue a public apology for the denial of justice, though denial of justice against a tax evasion accountant was not proved.

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